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NC Cooperative Extension Service

When Is Too Late To
Plant Soybeans??

The following information is compiled from NCSU Soybean Specialist Dr. Jim Dunphy and other Extension Agents. July 4th is the date on which Extension recommends to stop planting soybeans if you want a profitable crop. With that said here are a few reasons for that and some justifications for planting after July 4th. If you decide to plant soybeans, plant a late-maturing variety (Group 7 or Group 8). This is not a time to plant untested, unproven varieties. Narrow rows (7-inch, 15-inch, 21-inch) are recommended versus wide rows (30-inch). The later you plant, the more dependent you are on the weather. It’s not so much that we can’t produce a good crop of soybeans planted late, as it is that we are less likely to get the weather necessary to get a good crop of soybeans planted late. With a May planting date of determinate varieties, we can go through a week or two of poor growing conditions and still get the middles lapped with 3-feet tall plants (to capture as much sunlight as soybeans know how to capture). With later planting dates, we don’t have that luxury, but we’re likely to get a week or two of unproductive weather anyway. 60 Bu/A soybeans planted in July have been produced twice in on-farm tests. What’s not likely with July planting dates is getting middles lapped with 3-feet tall plants even though it can happen. So if you can get the growth, you can get very respectable yields. Not contest-winning yields, since the later planted crop will have fewer hours of sunlight to work with than a May planted crop, but respectable yields. For most of NC most of the time, the farmer needs some justification in addition to the profitability of the crop to warrant planting after the 4th of July. The field in front of Mama’s house gets planted. So does the one in front of your own house. The field that all the neighbors see and know is yours, especially in parts of the state where renting land is easier said than done, gets planted. Until time runs out, the better soil gets planted first. It has the best chance of being profitable.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

When Is Too Late To
Plant Soybeans??

The following information is compiled from NCSU Soybean Specialist Dr. Jim Dunphy and other Extension Agents. July 4th is the date on which Extension recommends to stop planting soybeans if you want a profitable crop. With that said here are a few reasons for that and some justifications for planting after July 4th. If you decide to plant soybeans, plant a late-maturing variety (Group 7 or Group 8). This is not a time to plant untested, unproven varieties. Narrow rows (7-inch, 15-inch, 21-inch) are recommended versus wide rows (30-inch). The later you plant, the more dependent you are on the weather. It’s not so much that we can’t produce a good crop of soybeans planted late, as it is that we are less likely to get the weather necessary to get a good crop of soybeans planted late. With a May planting date of determinate varieties, we can go through a week or two of poor growing conditions and still get the middles lapped with 3-feet tall plants (to capture as much sunlight as soybeans know how to capture). With later planting dates, we don’t have that luxury, but we’re likely to get a week or two of unproductive weather anyway. 60 Bu/A soybeans planted in July have been produced twice in on-farm tests. What’s not likely with July planting dates is getting middles lapped with 3-feet tall plants even though it can happen. So if you can get the growth, you can get very respectable yields. Not contest-winning yields, since the later planted crop will have fewer hours of sunlight to work with than a May planted crop, but respectable yields. For most of NC most of the time, the farmer needs some justification in addition to the profitability of the crop to warrant planting after the 4th of July. The field in front of Mama’s house gets planted. So does the one in front of your own house. The field that all the neighbors see and know is yours, especially in parts of the state where renting land is easier said than done, gets planted. Until time runs out, the better soil gets planted first. It has the best chance of being profitable.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

Soybeans and
Heat

The following is from NCSU Soybean Specialist Dr. Jim Dunphy- When temperatures get up to 95 degrees or more, soybeans tend to: Close their stomates to conserve moisture within the leaf. They can't move enough water through the plant to keep up with that high an evapotranspiration demand. Soil moisture levels, therefore, have little to do with it. Stop producing photosynthate, since carbon dioxide can't get in through those closed stomates either. Stop doing whatever they were trying to do at the time. Prior to blooming, they stop growing vegetatively until temperatures subside. How serious that becomes depends on whether they lap the middles with 36-inch tall plants anyway. Abort flowers. Not a big deal, since soybeans can replace those flowers, and soybeans don't seem to care much which flowers become pods. Abort small pods. This is a little more serious, but the plants may well have enough pods left anyway. If a pod was about half full size or bigger, it probably did not abort. Abort seeds within larger pods if the seeds were still pretty small. Produce smaller seeds if the seeds were very fairly big already. Remember that soybeans typically produce way more flowers and pods than the combine will ever find as pods, That's one of the major ways they survive adversity like this. The net result will probably be not much worse than losing a few days of potential production. I wouldn't expect any lasting effect of this response to high temperatures. If you have any questions or concerns you may contact Jacob Morgan anytime at 252-917-1204.

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Lenoir County
Voluntary Agricultural Districts

The purpose of the Agricultural District Program is to encourage the preservation and protection of farmland from non-farm development.  This is in recognition of the importance of agriculture to the economic and social well being of North Carolina. Find out how your property can be part of a Voluntary Agricultural District!

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new SHIIP volunteer

New SHIIP Volunteer

Barbara Pope (left), regional SHIIP representative and trainer, presents new Lenoir County SHIIP volunteer Pamela Eubanks with a Certificate of Completion at a recent meeting of Seniors' Health Insurance Information Program at the Cooperative Extension office.

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Food Processing and Manufacturing Initiative

Food Processing and
Manufacturing Initiative

NC food processing and manufacturing initiative feasiblity study released The agricultural resources, industrial capacity and research innovation assets present in North Carolina create opportunities to catalyze development of value-added food processing and manufacturing businesses, according to a joint NC State-NCDA&CS economic feasibity study released Jan. 12. One page summary of the Initiative View the Full Report

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EVENTS View All
Farmer's Market OpenTue Sep 1, 2015
8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Where:
Lenoir County Farmer's Market, 100 North Herritage Street, Kinston, NC 28501, United States
— 18 hours away
Parenting Matters ProgramTue Sep 1, 2015
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Where:
Lenoir County Co-Op Extension, 1791 Nc Highway 11 55, Kinston, NC 28504, United States
— Tomorrow
Farmer's Market OpenSat Sep 5, 2015
8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Where:
Lenoir County Farmer's Market, 100 North Herritage Street, Kinston, NC 28501, United States
— 5 days away
Farmer's Market OpenTue Sep 8, 2015
8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Where:
Lenoir County Farmer's Market, 100 North Herritage Street, Kinston, NC 28501, United States
— 1 week away
Master Gardeners MeetingTue Sep 8, 2015
2:00 PM - 4:00 PM Where:
Lenoir County Co-Op Extension, 1791 Nc Highway 11 55, Kinston, NC 28504, United States
— 1 week away
Parenting Matters ProgramTue Sep 8, 2015
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Where:
Lenoir County Co-Op Extension, 1791 Nc Highway 11 55, Kinston, NC 28504, United States
— 1 week away
Group ConnectionsThu Sep 10, 2015
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Where:
Lenoir County Co-Op Extension, 1791 Nc Highway 11 55, Kinston, NC 28504, United States
— 1 week away
Bird Conservation in the Face of Future Climate Change WebinarThu Sep 10, 2015
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Where:
http://www.sustainableforestswebinars.net/
— 1 week away
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