Are You Famous for Your Bread and Butter Pickles?,

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Or your pickled okra or beets? Whatever your specialty when it comes to preserving summer’s bounty…please share!! While fall weather is inviting at the end of a hot dry summer, it does mean that soon will be gone some of the delicious fresh vegetables of summer! For those of you hoping to “savor the flavor” here are some end of summer canning and pickling recipes.

Keep in mind; while most of us survived the methods used by our grandmothers, many food safety practices have changed. If you have a favorite recipe that has been handed down through the generations and are not sure, feel free to bring it by the Cooperative Extension Office for further inspection. For more information on Food Preservation just give us a call at the Lenoir County Cooperative Extension office at 252-527-2191, or contact your local county office.

If you are in fact famous for your Grandmother’s bread and butter pickles or strawberry jam, please remember a great place to share your pride in product is by entering in the County Fair. This year entries will be accepted on Friday, September 19, and Saturday, September 20. Rules for entry can be found at the end of this article.

If you are not yet proud of your preserving abilities you may find one of these recipes a good chance to learn how.

Pickled Green Beans

(Yields about 4 pints)

2 pounds green beans

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

4 heads dill or 4 teaspoons dill seed

4 cloves garlic

2 ½ cups water

2 ½ cups vinegar (5%)

¼ cup canning or pickling salt

Sterilize canning jars. Rinse, trim ends and cut beans into 4-inch pieces.

Pack beans, lengthwise, into hot jars, leaving ½ inch headspace. To each pint, add ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper, 1 clove garlic, and 1 dill head or1 teaspoon dill seed. Combine remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Pour boiling hot liquid over beans, leaving ½ inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 5 minutes in a boiling water canner. Let beans stand for at least two weeks before tasting to allow the flavor to develop.

Summer Squash Pickles

(Yields about 5 pints)

4 pounds summer squash

¼ cup canning or pickling salt

1 quart vinegar (5%)

1 cup water

Dill seed (1 teaspoon per pint)

Garlic, if desired (1 clove per pint)

Rinse squash; trim off ends. Then slice squash into ⅛- to ¼ inch rounds. Bring vinegar, water, and salt to a boil; simmer 5 minutes. Pack garlic, dill seed, and squash into jars, leaving ½ inch headspace. Fill jars to ½ inch from top with the hot brine. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 15 minutes in a boiling water canner.

Chow-Chow

(Yields about 4 pints)

1 pint of each of the following:

Sliced cucumbers

Chopped sweet peppers

Chopped cabbage

Sliced onions

Chopped green tomatoes

Fresh lima beans

Cut green beans

Sliced carrots

1 ½ cups canning or pickling salt

2 quarts water

2 tablespoons celery seed

4 tablespoons mustard seed

1 quart white distilled vinegar (5%)

2 cups water

4 cups sugar

4 teaspoons turmeric

Soak cucumbers, peppers, cabbage, onions and tomatoes in salt water (1 ½ cups salt to 2 quarts water) overnight in refrigerator. Cook lima beans, green beans and carrots until tender. Drain both mixtures well. Mix all vegetables with remaining ingredients and boil 10 minutes.

Fill hot chow-chow into hot pint jars, leaving ½ inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace if needed. Wipe jar rims. Adjust lids. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water canner.

Mint-Pineapple Jam
(with liquid pectin)

(Yield: About 9 or 10 half-pint jars)

1 20-oz. can crushed pineapple

¾ cup water

¼ cup lemon juice

7½ cups sugar

2 pouches liquid pectin

½ teaspoon mint extract

Few drops green coloring

Please learn about “Using Boiling Water Canners” before beginning. If this is your first time canning, it is recommended that you read “Principles of Home Canning.”

Procedure: Sterilize canning jars and prepare two-piece canning lids according to manufacturer’s directions.

To make jam. Place crushed pineapple in a kettle. Add water, lemon juice, and sugar and stir well. Place on high heat and, stirring constantly, bring quickly to a full boil with bubbles over the entire surface. Boil hard for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; add pectin, flavor extract, and coloring. Skim.

Fill hot jam immediately into hot, sterile jars, leaving ¼ inch headspace. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; adjust two-piece metal canning lids. Process in a Boiling Water Canner.

Recommended process time for Mint-Pineapple Jam in a boiling water canner.

Style of Pack – Hot

Jar Size – Half-pints or pints

Process Time at Altitudes of; 0 – 100ft. – 5 min., 1001 – 6000 ft. – 10 min., Above 6,000 ft. – 15 min.

Apple Preserves
(with powdered pectin)

(Yield: About 6 half-pint jars)

 

6 cups peeled, cored, sliced apples

1 cup water

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 package powdered pectin

½ lemon, thinly sliced (optional)

4 cups sugar

2 teaspoons ground nutmeg

Please learn about “Using Boiling Water Canners” before beginning. If this is your first time canning, it is recommended that you read “Principles of Home Canning.”

Procedure: Sterilize canning jars. Combine apples, water and lemon juice in a large saucepot. Simmer, covered for 10 minutes. Stir in pectin and bring to a full rolling boil, stirring frequently.

Add lemon slices (optional) and sugar. Return to a full rolling boil. Boil hard 1 minute, stirring frequently. Remove from heat; add nutmeg. Pour hot preserves into hot jars, leaving ¼-inch headspace. Wipe rims of jars with a dampened clean paper towel; adjust two-piece metal canning lids. Process in a Boiling Water Canner.

Recommended process time for Mint-Pineapple Jam in a boiling water canner.

Style of Pack – Hot

Jar Size – Half-pints or pints

Process Time at Altitudes of; 0 – 100ft. – 5 min., 1001 – 6000 ft. – 10 min., Above 6,000 ft. – 15 min.

Competition Guidelines for Lenoir County Fair Food Preservation

(Other fairs will have similar guidelines, even the NC State Fair, however check to be sure)

  1. Use standard canning jars only, none smaller that ½ pint.
  2. Fruits and tomatoes should be processed in boiling water bath or pressure canner. Low acid vegetables must be processed in pressure canner.
  3. Follow the canning guidelines from current editions of these sources:
    1. Canning in NC
    2. Putting Food By
    3. USDA Guide to Home Canning
    4. Ball Blue Book
    5. Kerr Home Canning
    6. So East to Preserve
  4. All entries must be labeled by taping the information on the back or bottom of jar the with the following information:
    1. Date Canned
    2. Contents
    3. Processing Method
    4. Processing Time
    5. Label Example; June 13, 2015 – Green Beans – Pressure Canner – 25 minutes.
  5. Jellies, pickles and relishes may be opened for tasting.
  6. Do Not use paraffin.
  7. If rules are not followed entries will be